My Cosmology Bookshelf


I read a considerable number of cosmology and physics books written mostly for the general public. Perhaps a better phrase is books written for “general consumption,” as I’m not sure how many people would really enjoy reading “Black Holes and Time Warps: Einstein’s Outrageous Legacy” (Kip Thorne) or “The Tao of Physics: An Exploration of…

Book Review: Anansi Boys, by Neil Gaiman


Anansi Boys, by Neil Gaiman. Harper Torch Fiction Publishing. 2005. $8. I’m not sure Neil needs his books reviewed, actually. His books are enjoyable fiction. If you like Douglas Adams, you might enjoy Anansi Boys. British humor is hilarious; their gift for understatement tickles me. Douglas Adams was the godfather of understatements and eloquently contrived…

Book Review: City of Bones, by Michael Connelly


Book Review: City of Bones, by Michael Connelly. Grand Central Publishing. Hachette Book Group. ©2002. $10 Blurbs on books are worthless. Honestly, the accolades plastered across paperbacks are pointless. “Sizzles with energy,” “Invigorating,” “Haunting,” do not accurately assess procedural crime fiction novels like City of Bones. I’m not taking anything away from Mr. Connelly or any…

Book Review: Breakdown, by Sara Paretsky


Breakdown, by Sara Paretsky. Signet Select; Penguin Books. 2012. $10. Ms. Paretsky’s books are not for juveniles. I mean, young adults could read them, and probably should read them, actually. They would have a wonderful role model for writing fiction, for spending time thinking about writing, for constructing an amazingly detailed framework upon which to…